Marking behavior, population density estimates, and terrain use of Andean bears Tremarctos ornatus – generating knowledge for conservation of a threatened umbrella species

  • Focal species: Tremarctos ornatus – Andean bear
  • Secondary species: Herpailurus yagouaroundi, Leopardus pardalis, Puma concolor, Tapirus pinchaque, Tayassu pecari
  • Countries: Ecuador
  • Name of organisation: Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
  • Support requested:
    contributions for specific items >1000 euro,
    contributions to running of project <1000 euro
  • Does this project benefit local people through employment and/or capacity building: yes
  • Does this project benefit local people in other ways: This project employs local guides. We are developing a human-bear conflict risk map, which will be shared with local communities and other organizations. Together, we look for solutions to the conflict. We have provided outdoor equipment to the communities and we plan to purchase study equipment for local school children. We will organise a workshop on human-bear conflict for the communities.
  • This project concept is endorsed by:
    • the EAZA TAG relevant to the primary taxon

Project Description

The Andean bear is endemic to South America, and has the status of an umbrella species. Andean bears are classified as ‘Vulnerable to extinction, decreasing’ according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened species and locally as ‘Endangered’. The general ecology and status of local populations of Andean bear remains poorly understood. Two important reasons explain this knowledge gap. First, the Andean bear is a challenging species to study, because it has an elusive nature and inhabits inaccessible habitat. Secondly, resources for wildlife research are very scarce in South America. During a pilot project in 2012-2015, we used remote video cameras to study marking behavior of Andean bears near the Sumaco Biosphere reserve in Ecuador. Besides interesting preliminary results, we identified several key-research needs for the management and conservation of Andean bears. I) The functional significance of marking behavior of Andean bears remains unclear. II) Local population status is typically unknown. III) Virtually nothing is known about the spatial features of Andean bear marking and habitat selection. IV) An open biological sample database for Andean bears is currently lacking. Additionally, V) we intend to enroll Filipczykova into a PhD program at the Central Queensland University (CQUniversity).
Since 2016, we work on the above-mentioned key research-needs and objectives using camera trapping and GPS mapping of bear sign data in two study populations in Ecuador. In addition, we established collaborations with other research groups, local communities, and governmental and non-governmental organizations in order to reduce human-bear conflict. Currently we are searching for funding that would support our field work for the season 2018/2019, especially extensive habitat measurements; i.e. camera traps, camping equipment, guide salaries, other technical equipment. Also, Filipczyková got accepted as a PhD student at CQUniversity focusing on conservation of Andean bears through their marking behavior and data obtained from this project. CQUniversity approved a fee waiver, which means that we are still looking for funding to support Filipczyková\’s salary.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.