Saving Delacour’s langur in Vietnam

hreatened by the loss of their forest habitat, primarily for agriculture and limestone (cement) quarrying, and hunting, for the creation of the ‘monkey bone balm’, a traditional Chinese medicine, Delacour’s langur are one of the world’s 25 most threatened primates. Van Long Nature Reserve in Ninh Binh province, northern Vietnam, is home to around 120 individuals and until last year there was no other viable population known to exist.
In late 2016 FFI surveys discovered a second significant population of around 40-50 langurs in Kim Bang forest in Vietnam’s Ha Nam province. Following the discovery, FFI immediately developed a ‘rapid response’ programme aimed at improving protection and gaining political support for forest and langur protection. With limited funds, FFI has trained and operationalised a six person community conservation team to undertake forest patrols and basic monitoring to protect these langurs, and has gained formal approval for the establishment of a new protected area in Kim Bang to conserve this critical population. A unique opportunity now exists to significantly contribute to the survival of this species by supporting the operationalisation of this new protected area and linking the population here to the population in Ninh Binh province.
Our vision for Delacour’s langur is to increase the population in the two remaining sites for the species to over 350 individuals in 20 -25 years.
Over the next three years we aim to enhance the formal protection of the species, reconnect key habitat and observe an increase in the total population of at least 10%. Our priority activities over the next three years are to: 1. Enhance habitat protection through the establishment of a new protected area; 2. Increase habitat availability and reduce risk of inbreeding through creating habitat corridors; 3. Establish community led conservation initiatives to support habitat conservation and species monitoring

Saving the Tonkin Snub Nosed Monkey in Vietnam

Endemic to Vietnam, the Tonkin snub-nosed monkey once occupied the forests across much of the north-east of the country. Loss of habitat and hunting – for both local consumption and the traditional medicine trade – have driven a precipitous decline in this species. Until their rediscovery in 1992, the Tonkin snub-nosed monkey was believed to be extinct; we now know that fewer than 200 individuals remain.
In 2002 FFI identified the largest known subpopulation, around 90 individuals at the time, at a site called Khau Ca and began work to conserve it. Thanks to the work of FFI the site has received formal legal protection and our concerted conservation efforts have enabled this population of Tonkin snub-nosed monkey to stabilise. Based on FFI field surveys, the population here has increased to around 121 individuals.
Recognising that working at a single site would always present inherent risks to the longterm survival of the species, we actively sought other sites where we hoped to find the species had survived. In 2008 FFI discovered a second site, Tung Vai, with around 30 monkeys which we have subsequently worked to protect.
Our Longterm vision: to increase the population in our two focal sites to over 500 individuals in approximately 25 years.
In the short term, ensuring the integrity of the habitat at our two local sites will be critical to the survival of the species. In the next three years we aim to maintain the growth of Khau Ca\’s Tonkin snub-nosed monkeys and at least stabilise the Tung Vai population. Our priority activities over the next three years are to: 1. Enhance habitat protection through improved law enforcement; 2. Increase habitat abailability through creating habitat corridors; 3. Balance the conflicting priorities of conservation and agriculture faced in Tonkin snub-nosed monkey habitats; 4. Address capacity gaps within the relevant agencies to tackle the illegal wildlife trade in primates and timber.

Kinabatangan Orang-utan Conservation Programme

HUTAN is a French grassroots non-profit organisation created in 1996, to develop and implement innovative solutions to conserve orangutan and other wildlife species in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.
HUTAN and the Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) initiated the Kinabatangan Orang-utan Conservation Programme (KOCP) in 1998 to study orang-utan adaptation to forest disturbance and to design and implement sound conservation strategies for this species and its habitat.
Today our team is composed of more than 60 highly skilled staff hailing from the Orang Sungai community. To achieve our vision, we have developed a holistic strategy combining long-term scientific research, wildlife and habitat protection and management, policy work, capacity building, education and awareness, as well as community outreach and development. The “Orangutan Research Team” has been running the longest non-interrupted field study of wild orangutans in Borneo. The “Wildlife Survey and Protection” Unit is in charge of alleviating Human-Elephant conflicts, conducting biodiversity surveys and law enforcement activities, and is in charge of our succesfull artificial nest boxes project. The HUTAN “Environmental Awareness Program” reaches out school children and villagers throughout Sabah. The “Reforestation Team” is active in bare lands or encroached areas where forest regeneration cannot occur naturally. The “Pangi Swiflet Recovery Unit” is in charge of guarding colonies of edible-nest swiflets against any poacher. HUTAN has developed a capcity building platform to train various partners ranging from villagers to industry players (timber, oil palm plantation) and civil servants about biodiversiy monitoring and protection. Last but not least, we are using our community-based ground approach to inform policies and management startegies at the local, national and international levels.

Green Gospel: faith and the conservation of the Critically Endangered Macaca nigra

Selamatkan Yaki is a research, conservation and education programme focussed on protecting the last remaining populations of Sulawesi crested black macaques (Macaca nigra).
Following recommendations from stakeholder workshops in key areas for M. nigra conservation, we developed a Local Ambassador Programme to build capacity for conservation in North Sulawesi, a pre-dominantly Christian province where religion plays an important role in people’s lives. Previous research identified that bushmeat trade generally peaks around Christian celebrations (Lee, et al. 2005), and that belief is a key attribute for fostering proenvironmental behaviour. We adapted Stone’s (1997) 2-step training approach for our focus on empowering influential religious leaders and students through our Green Gospel project. Through participatory workshops we provide conservation materials and education resources developed by the SY team, such as the Sunday School syllabus and resource book, and inspirational videos. The workshops aim to: 1) identify connections between Christianity and conservation, 2) develop conservation materials for church implementation, and 3) initiate collaboration between conservation projects and churches.
Our team also facilitate participants in group discussions to identify environmental issues in and around their congregations and brainstorm about how to mitigate these issues by linking conservation activities to suitable Bible verses and messages. In line with both our Green Gospel project and Local Ambassador programme, within the next year we aim to expand our outreach to Christian universities, to engage with young trainee religious leaders and promote them as ‘Green Gospel Pioneers’.
With support through LINCZ our local team will be empowered to strengthen relationships with church leaders as well as Christian-based universities for further implementation of the Green Gospel project. We will expand the local ambassador program to church youth forums, promote the inspiring ‘Green Gospel Pioneers’ and implement our unique interactive Sunday School church syllabus.

Biodiversity conservation in the Annamite mountains of Laos

Project Anoulak is dedicated to the conservation and research of wildlife in Laos. It is active in Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area (NNT NPA), central eastern Laos. We focus on a range of species notably on the white-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus siki/N. leucogenys), the red-shanked doucs, the large-antlered muntjac and otter species (Lutrogale; Aonyx, Lutra).
We are currently conducting a long-term behavioural ecology research on the white-cheeked gibbons and red-shanked doucs. Across their range, these species are under severe threat from (i) illegal hunting (traditional medicine, pet trade and opportunistically for its meat) and from (ii) habitat loss, which is the most severe in Vietnam (Rawson et al., 2011). The seven species of Nomascus spp. and three species of doucs are Globally Threatened under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In NNT NPA, wildlife hunting has been the main cause of animal population declines in the the past few decades and this on-going trend is rapidly leading to local extinction of the most hunting-sensitive species.
Given the current status of gibbon and douc species across their range there is a need to better understand their ecological requirements in order to improve their in-situ and ex-situ conservation management. Understanding the ecology of these species is one of the first steps in the development of conservation management plans and guidelines.
Conservation outcome 1: Gain knowledge of feeding ecology and nutrional requirements of white-cheeked gibbons and red-shanked douc to improve in-situ and ex-situ population management
Conservation outcome 2: Protection of white-cheeked gibbons and red-shanked douc at the research site with patrol teams
Conservation Outcome 3: Capacity building of lao nationals and local communty engagement and empowerment in conservation biology
Conservation Outcome 4: Knowledge sharing and building collaboration with research institutes and institutions.