Save the Drill (Rettet den Drill e.V.)    

Drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) are among Africa’s most endangered monkeys and are listed by the IUCN as the highest conservation priority of all African primates. Drills are found in Nigeria, Cameroon and on the Island of Bioko. Their entire world range is less than 30,000km².
Despite the fact that both in Cameroon and Nigeria drills are protected under local law, the fight to save the drills is more important than ever before, especially on the international front. One of these projects is “Pandrillus”. The Drill Ranch in Calabar and in the Afi Mountains in Nigeria and the Limbe Wildlife Center (LWC) in Cameroon are rescue, rehabilitation and reintroduction/release projects, founded in 1993.

By providing a long-term solution for confiscated wildlife and working with the local and international community, the project aims to secure the survival of the drill.

The Pandrillus project proposes to ultimately create and develop a complex of semi-free forested enclosures, aimed for Drills, in view of future reintroduction into the wild. The reintroduction of Drills in the wild will contribute to restore the ecosystem and therefore ensure its sustainability through ecotourism conducted in partnership with local community.
This is a unique project in Cameroon and Nigeria, focusing on the endangered Drill, one symbol and emblematic of the biodiversity.

“Save the Drill”, a German non-profit organization is working since 2004 for financial support for Pandrillus.
Most of our members are directly involved with the work with in Zoos (Veterinarian, Keeper but also the German drill keeping zoos itself are members).

Community-based Patrols and Nest Guardians to Combat Poaching of the Critically Endangered Helmeted Hornbill in Indonesia

The Helmeted Hornbill (Rhinoplax vigil) inhabits lowland and upland rainforests in Southeast Asia. Recent data has shown that the Helmeted Hornbill red ivory in China is nearly five times that of elephant ivory. From 2012 to 2014 over 1,000 casks were confiscated by the Indonesian government, and in 2013 one study estimated nearly 500 adult Helmeted Hornbills were killed per month (6,000 per year) in the West Kalimantan province alone. The evolutionary circumstances of this species cause it to be at high risk for extinction as this species breeds slowly and exists at extremely low carrying capacities. In West Kalimantan, Indonesia the Helmeted Hornbill is the provincial symbol and can be found at tourist attractions throughout the province. Despite the appearance of “local pride” in this species, this province has been the target of the trade in Indonesia with an estimated 80% of casks exported from Indonesia originating from Western Borneo. The purpose of this project is to counter wildlife trafficking in West Kalimantan, Indonesia by increasing protection of habitat and increasing law enforcement to conserve the symbol of West Kalimantan. This project is intended to conserve the Helmeted Hornbill by addressing the impacts of the yellow and red ivory trade that is decimating populations throughout the species range. Specific activities focus engaging communities in the Gunung Nuit Nature Reserve in community-based SMART patrol units and a Nest Guardians program.