Protecting and Restoring Rare Biodiversity Sustainability in Mara River Transboundary Basin in Tanzania

Project description (max. 300 words): It aim to promote sustainable conservation and practices for
uninformed and unreachable 400 artisan miners became aware in conservation needs and have
regulated system to protect and restore critically endangered Pancake tortoises those highly affected
by active and irregularities gold mines; proposed responsible mining plans, conservation education
and enhance outreach to both miners and adjacent villagers shall save pancake tortoise out of
extinction in few years to come if existing mines would not be regulated at this global found pancake
habitats. Pancake tortoises are founds only in Kenya and Tanzania; preferably in a shared Mara river
basin trans boundary where mining could leads them to extinction! Artisan gold miners crushes rocky
crevices (traditional habitats for tortoises) in search for gold ore where tends to kills and injuries
leads to ecological threats; deeply miners fragile habitats, destabilize hatching rates and erode
massive entire ecology, erosive untreated Geo- chemicals wastes in 90% makes hazardous
contaminated water in its way to Lake Victoria after local gold recovery in irresponsible process ;also
tends to affect human health where miners touch chemicals without gears and drink contaminated
water, diminish local economy (adjacent farms) ,biodiversity and dense air pollution effects while
ends to decline pancake population and fertility rate as they depends staying in predictable gold
rocks, the mining affects water ,vegetations and increase air pollution due to rampant use of mercury
;Geo-chemical wastes greatly endangering endemic biodiversity sustainability belongs in the basin.

Space to Call their Own: Protecting Eselengei, Kenya

Encompassing over 200,000 acres, Eselengei is the northernmost tract of intact wilderness in the Amboseli-Tsavo-Kilimanjaro (Greater Amboseli) ecosystem in southern Kenya. With every year, its importance and the need to conserve it is growing. Over the years, Big Life Foundation’s rangers have played a central role in controlling poaching and making the Greater Amboseli ecosystem a safer place. As a result, animals—especially elephants—are now venturing further from Amboseli National Park and deeper into Eselengei. They are also staying there for longer. This safe zone is not just important for elephants; Eselengei is also a stronghold of the ecosystem’s lion population, as well as home to a wide diversity of other species. However, Eselengei is surrounded by communities that are not always friendly to wildlife. Poachers, targeting bushmeat and sometimes ivory, operate along its northern boundaries, frequently picking off animals in the areas outside of the existing conservancy that lies within Eselengei. In 2018, five elephants were speared to death in a series of horrific events.

In response, Big Life plans to expand its successful wildlife protection and conservation model to Eselengei. This includes adding two permanent ranger outposts, fully equipped and manned by recruits from the Eselengei community, and supported by a Land Cruiser vehicle that will allow for rapid response to emergencies. These rangers will not just work to protect wildlife on Eselengei (often by providing support to the people who share this space), but will also respond when animals cross the invisible barrier into neighboring ‘hostile’ territory.

Also, Big Life will implement its Predator Compensation Fund (PCF) to Eselengei. The fund provides livestock owners with financial compensation for all verified losses of their animals to the ecosystem’s wild predators. This program has been immensely successful over the years, helping to increase the lion population throughout the ecosystem.

 

Reducing human-carnivore conflict, empowering communities and informing conservation planning in Tanzania\’s Ruaha landscape

Tanzania’s Ruaha landscape is globally important for large carnivores. It supports the world’s second biggest lion population, comprising 10% of the world\’s lions, one of only four large cheetah populations in East Africa, the world\’s third biggest population of endangered African wild dogs, and vital populations of leopards, spotted hyaenas and other wildlife species. However, these populations are threatened by extremely high rates of human-carnivore conflict around Ruaha National Park: this area has the highest documented rate of lion killing in the world. This conflict is driven by carnivore attacks on livestock, a lack of benefits from wildlife, cultural lion killins, and poor local awareness of wildlife or conservation issues. The Ruaha Carnivore Project (RCP) is working directly with local communities to safeguard their livestock, develop appropriate and meaningful benefit initiatives which are linked directly to the presence of wildlife on village land, engage traditional warriors to become lion conservationists rather than lion killers, and provide training, education and outreach on livestock husbandry, wildlife and conservation. This area is also extremely understudied, limiting effective planning and management, so RCP conducts ecological research to inform conservation planning. The project was established in 2009, and has grown from a team of 3 people to over 60 people, 95% of whom are local Tanzanians. The project has been very successful: in the core study area, attacks on livestock have been reduced by over 60%, people see meaningful benefits, partcularly in the their priority areas of healthcare, education and veterinary health, attitudes towards wildlife have improved, bans on cultural hunting have been put in place by the community, and carnivore killings have decreased by over 80%. However, this is a huge area so we need to continue our work and expand it further around Ruaha and beyond for maximum conservation impact.